Celebrity Cruises has no problem rehiring its crew: Exec


  • Celebrity Cruises has had no problem rehiring workers as the cruise line continues to resume passenger crossings.
  • In a first quarter survey, 98% of its crew said they were “ready to come back,” a company executive told Insider.
  • The general hospitality and leisure industry has been plagued by ongoing staff shortages.

Celebrity Cruises of the Royal Caribbean Group have had no problem rehiring crew members despite staff shortages in the general hospitality and leisure industry, said Brian Abel, senior vice president of hotel operations at the cruise line, to Insider in an interview.

Throughout 2021, the “big resignation” and difficulties in rehiring workers plagued adjacent industries like hotels, restaurants and airlines. But according to Abel, Celebrity Cruises was unaffected by these widespread staffing difficulties, and instead found that the majority of its crew wanted to return to the business.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Celebrity has tried to keep its workers “engaged” through a series of webinars and newsletters. And in the first quarter, the company sent a survey to its crew to ask if they were “ready to come back.” According to Abel, 98% of the staff said they were, and of those respondents, 98% said they would be ready to get the shot.

Abel attributes Celebrity’s ability to retain workers to the company’s ‘great culture’ and the lack of other hospitality jobs that were available during the COVID-19 pandemic, which could have poached its members of the public. ‘crew.

“They work here because they can’t find a comparable job in their home country with the same type of salary,” he said, noting that the company’s team comes from over 60 years old. country. “They’re back here to work, to do what they love, and they’re vaccinated. And a lot of [their home] countries still have challenges. “

However, like other cruise lines, Celebrity has encountered difficulties with the logistics of the return of its international crew.

“The only challenge [has been] crew movement, ”Abel said. “Get them back to dealing with all the different types of protocols and regulations from different countries. But the willingness of the crews to return was not a problem. “